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Tasmanian Photography: The Colours of Mt Wellington

Tasmanian Photography: The Colours of Mt Wellington

Thursday December 20, 2012

Tasmanian photography is characterised by remote mountain top views and wilderness forests, but Mt Wellington offers so much for photographers slightly limited by travel or time requirements. Mt Wellington is the spectacular backdrop to Hobart, visible from whichever direction you approach the state capital. At 1271 metres high and with a very good, sealed road all the way to the top there are great opportunities for some wonderful photographic experiences. I spent a recent weekend doing a number of visits to the mountain, including a very peaceful sunrise on the summit, an evening in the mist and a short walk to a very nice little waterfall.

Tasmanian photography - Sunrise from Mt Wellington

Sunrise over Hobart, Mt Wellington

Haunting colours after a magical sunrise

Haunting colours after a magical sunrise

Tasmanian photography - Mist & boulders, Mt Wellington

Mist over the rocky pinnacle of Mt Wellington

Tasmanian photography - snowgum woodland at dusk

Misty snowgum woodland at dusk

Tasmanian photography - waterfall in the foothills of Mt Wellington

Hidden waterfall in the foothills of Mt Wellington

Visitors to Mount Wellington should prepare for temperatures much colder than in central Hobart. A good rule of thumb is to expect the temperature to be approximately 10 degrees cooler at the summit. The mountain attracts cloud, wind and rain at any time of the year, and snowfall and severe frosts are common in winter. If the weather is looking a bit dicey take a look at the Wellington Park website run by the Hobart City Council for current conditions, including road closures. You can also check current weather conditions on Mt Wellington via the Bureau of Meteorology page. Needless to say if its gusting upwards of 50 kmh think twice about an extended trip to the top! If you are determined to head up during winter, make sure you check these sites first. Road closures are not uncommon during Tasmania’s icy winter.

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