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Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

Inspiration

There are plenty of photographers and images that have been a great source of inspiration for me over the years, especially when I still lived in Melbourne and was just getting into photography and “discovering” Tasmania.

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

Perhaps my favourite, but it is a tough call…

Many images by Peter Dombrovskis, of course, but another one in particular I have always admired was a shot by Rob Blakers of some simply magnificent old myrtle beech (Nothofagus cuninghamii) trees in the mist somewhere in Tasmania – not too much about the location was ever given away and I won’t be changing that here today 🙂

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

Portrait of a giant.

So after many years, it was a great pleasure to visit this site with fellow ex-Melbourne and now local Tasmanian photographer Cam Blake on a stunningly still and misty morning recently. The result was one of the nicest couple of hours I have experienced in the great forests of Tasmania – and I have seen a lot of nice Tasmanian forests!

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

This one particular giant was the star of the show

 

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

One of the giants. The root in the foreground was quite eye catching

 

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

The mist was sublime

 

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

Amazing old tree

 

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

I kept coming back to this angle

 

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

Another giant, just a short walk from the other

 

Tasmanian myrtle beech trees in the mist

Nice forest scene near the creek

The scene was so perfectly still I was able to use the Pentax “pixel shift” mode for a lot of these shots. The pixel shift feature basically results in an extremely detailed image, and extremely accurate colour reproduction as the camera shoots the scene 4 times, moving the sensor by 1 pixel width between each shot. Due to the multiple exposures any movement in the scene causes trouble, so you really do need perfectly still conditions to use this feature in the field.

I hope you enjoy the shots even just a fraction as much as I enjoyed taking them 🙂

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Luke O'Brien

About Luke

Luke O'Brien runs a stall at Hobart's popular Salamanca Market every Saturday where his prints and cards are available for purchase. Follow Luke's photographic adventures on Twitter at @lukeobrienphoto, at his Facebook page or by subscribing to his email newsletter.