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Mt Field National Park

Macro Photography – Tasmania’s Alpine Plants

Some macro shots of the alpine plants encountered on our recent visit to Mt Field East. The bright sunny conditions weren’t necessarilly the best for wide landscape photos, so most of what I did was macro and abstract photography. Often these shots involved shading the subject from the harsh sun with an umbrella. Sometimes I think...Read More

Bushwalking in Tasmania – Mt Field East

Summer means bushwalking in Tasmania – with big ol’ blue skies and nice warm weather. The other day we took advantage of some stellar February weather and trundled off to Mt Field East. Mt Field East again is a dolerite mountain, although the tall columns of rock have long since collapsed and the mountain is...Read More

Winter in Tasmania – Mt Field National Park

Winter in Tasmania can mean heaps and heaps of snow (although as everyone points out there is nowhere near as much as there used to be). Just before we left for Japan there was a major snowfall, over western Tasmania, and even Hobart. Mt Wellington was covered in a thick creamy layer of deep snow...Read More

Autumn in Tasmania: Fagus Mt Field

Autumn in Tasmania means one thing – the turning of the fagus. Mt Field is the most accessible place to view the autumn display of Tasmania’s Fagus (Nothofagus gunii) which is a Tasmanian endemic tree, and Australia’s only native deciduous tree – meaning unlike the eucalypts and rainforest species which keep their leaves green all year...Read More

Tasmanian Waterfalls: Horseshoe Falls, Mt Field

Russell Falls seems to get all the attention as one of the most famous Tasmanian waterfalls, but Horseshoe Falls a little further along the path is something of a quiet achiever and is often overlooked. This is a pity as it really is worth a visit and some would argue even more picturesque than Russell...Read More

Fagus at Tarn Shelf, Mt Field

Tasmania’s Gondwanic connection is firing at the moment, as the autumn colour returns to Australia’s only winter deciduous tree, the Fagus. Each autumn, around Anzac day, the small green leaves of the fagus, which is a Tasmanian endemic found only in the higher mountainous areas of western Tasmania, change into hues of yellow, orange and (if you’re lucky),...Read More