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Mt Field and South West

Styx Valley: Photographing Tasmania’s Wild Forests

For an out of the way location, the Styx Valley is surprisingly accesible, and full of wonderful photographic reward. The area is known for it’s reserve of giant eucalypts which tower above a lovely rainforest understory which is full of exquisite green moss, gnarled old trees and tiny details that you don’t fully appreciate until you get down...Read More

Russell Falls – Tragedy Strikes!

Tragedy has struck at Russell Falls – a couple of Sassafras trees have fallen right across the front of the viewing platform, meaning budding photographers are going to have to walk that extra little bit further to get nice waterfall shots up at Horseshoe Falls… The falls are full and fast flowing right now, so...Read More

Fagus on the Tarn Shelf walk, Mt Field

My final venture to the autumn colours this year was with Brisbane based photographer, Michael Snedic, together with whom we will be presenting a Tasmanian Experience 7 Day Photography Workshop later in the year. While he was here in early May we ventured off to do the Tarn Shelf walk at Mt Field, where we...Read More

“Autumn Flowers” – Mushrooms & Toadstools Macro Photography

Just as the mountains, parks and gardens come alive in the spring and summer with beautiful displays of wildflowers, the forest floor displays a stunning range of colour and intricate macro detail in autumn as myriad small (and some not-so-small!) fungi appear in all sorts of places. I am no expert in the field of fungus-ology so rather...Read More

From the Vaults II: Wylds Craig

Following on from my earlier “From the Vault” post, here is a “historic” selection of photos from one of my first overnight bushwalks in Tasmania – Wylds Craig in the Florentine Valley. Again this was in the pre-digital days, and on this trip I had a roll of Fuji Velvia in the trusty ol’ Pentax MZ50. After a relatively...Read More

Macro Photography – Tasmania’s Alpine Plants

Some macro shots of the alpine plants encountered on our recent visit to Mt Field East. The bright sunny conditions weren’t necessarilly the best for wide landscape photos, so most of what I did was macro and abstract photography. Often these shots involved shading the subject from the harsh sun with an umbrella. Sometimes I think...Read More

Bushwalking in Tasmania – Mt Field East

Summer means bushwalking in Tasmania – with big ol’ blue skies and nice warm weather. The other day we took advantage of some stellar February weather and trundled off to Mt Field East. Mt Field East again is a dolerite mountain, although the tall columns of rock have long since collapsed and the mountain is...Read More

Winter in Tasmania – Mt Field National Park

Winter in Tasmania can mean heaps and heaps of snow (although as everyone points out there is nowhere near as much as there used to be). Just before we left for Japan there was a major snowfall, over western Tasmania, and even Hobart. Mt Wellington was covered in a thick creamy layer of deep snow...Read More

Tasmanian Photography Locations Part I: Gordon River Road

I am often asked what my own personal favourite location to shoot in Tasmania is and funnily enough I always struggle to have one straight off the bat answer, so I thought I’d compile a list of 5 regions which have provided me with some of my most memorable photographic experiences over the past few years. Part 1: Gordon...Read More

Autumn in Tasmania: Fagus Mt Field

Autumn in Tasmania means one thing – the turning of the fagus. Mt Field is the most accessible place to view the autumn display of Tasmania’s Fagus (Nothofagus gunii) which is a Tasmanian endemic tree, and Australia’s only native deciduous tree – meaning unlike the eucalypts and rainforest species which keep their leaves green all year...Read More